Tag Archives: media

Journalist technology column: Journalism drones / Google Reader alternatives

The use of drones in warfare has been rightly controversial. But they are also attracting the interest of journalists and with two US Journalism schools teaching students how to use drones for reporting it was a good time to look at this new tool for the technology colum.

There are a lot of ethical, legal and regulatory issues to consider, and while drones clearly have their uses, some journalists will clearly feel uncomfortable with this innovation.

Here are some links to articles I found useful when researching this feature. You can also see links to content on alternatives to Google Reader, which relate to my review of Feedly.

You can download the Journalist from the NUJ website.

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BBC Parliament’s ’92 Election Bonanza

In February I blogged about the beauty of news in its purest form and why it is worthwhile reviewing news from the past. My main point was that when news is processed into documentaries for example after the event, that raw instant reaction and early analysis is lost. Yesterday’s broadcast of the BBC’s 1992 election coverage as live on BBC Parliament hammered this point home. Continue reading

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Could the Mail bring some colour to India’s media?

Originally uploaded by littlesaint_uk.

I’ve just returned from a trip to India where I traveled around the southern states of Karnataka and Goa. It’s my third visit to India and each time I have kept up with world news mainly through Indian newspapers like the Times of India and the Hindu.

Having briefly worked on an Indian paper, I am interested in how the media there is affected by the changes to the industry that we have face in Europe. One thing I have noticed is fewer features and original news in Indian papers than previously. This is a shame both for the reader and for India-based journalists, many of whom must be itching to bring hard-hitting stories to their readers’ attention. Continue reading

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Where are the women?

Originally uploaded by MeLicA.

This morning Radio 4’s Today programme hosted a discussion between three successful career women about the existence of a glass ceiling preventing women from progressing in their careers. It was part of former Commons speaker Betty Boothroyd’s stint as guest editor of the show.

The discussion involved Lorraine Heggessey, the first female controller of BBC1, Lucy Neville Rolfe, executive director and a member of the board of Tesco  and Rachel Lomax, former deputy governor of the Bank of England. They agreed that often women need to speak up a bit more and overcome the barriers in their own mind, such as fear of failure.

Heggessey said men are often better at pointing out all the things they can do whereas women are often stuck on what they can’t do. If men do get that voice in their head “they squash it down,” she said. Continue reading

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Freelance but not fancy free

Abdullah’s words, which she deeply regrets, might never have been seen by the families of the young men who died had it not been for the fact that some people who spotted them noticed that her Twitter profile said she had written for the Guardian. This led some Twitter users to leap to the conclusion that she was on the newspaper’s staff, which amplified their shock and surprise.

via Open door: Kia Abdullah, Twitter and the Guardian | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Last week the Guardian received complaints about tweets made by a writer who occasionally writes for the Comment is Free section of its website.

This week, readers’ editor Chris Elliott dealt with the incident, in which the freelancer Kia Abdullah, made an attempt at some black humour on Twitter following the deaths of three backpackers in Thailand. The joke backfired and Abdullah’s association with the Guardian led to complaints to the paper.  Even Alan Rusbridger, the editor in chief, ended up commenting when he described the remarks as “grossly insensitive”.

I won’t go into too much detail about the original tweets (which Abdullah has now removed on request and apologised for) and the aftermath which Elliott has described in his column. What I want to post about is freelancing and responsibility to our clients and how far this should go. Continue reading

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The death of the reporter’s notebook?



Originally uploaded by Brenderous.

Long before social media and smart phones, the humble notebook was the reporter’s best friend. And for most of us it still is.

But not just any old notebook for the majority of print journalists it has to be spiral bound at the top of the pages making it easier to flick over the page. Anything else just won’t cut it when writing at speed.

In fact, the “reporter’s notebook” or “shorthand notebook” almost sets journalists that work with words apart from their counterparts who work in the media of television and radio. Continue reading

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The Twelfth Night – An epiphany for community journalists?



Originally uploaded by Pics by K.

So we reach the twelfth night, an evening normally associated with taking down Christmas decorations. But in Italy it’s the children’s Christmas when the good witch La Bafana visits families leaving gifts of fruit and sweets for children. And like La Bafana I am here to deliver a final Christmas gift – a blogpost rounding up my 12 Days of Christmas uploads.

Looking back over the previous days, I am finding a clear theme emerging in the content – community. As Adam Westbrook said back on Day 8, it’s becoming a big thing for journalists.

In an earlier post I highlighted the role of community manager as a key discipline for journalists in the future. Laura Oliver, who started her new job as a community manager at the Guardian earlier this week, told me that media organisations are taking this role more seriously. In the clip recorded back in June she said that community management is becoming a distinct role with its own set of skills. Continue reading

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