Tag Archives: News

BBC Parliament’s ’92 Election Bonanza

In February I blogged about the beauty of news in its purest form and why it is worthwhile reviewing news from the past. My main point was that when news is processed into documentaries for example after the event, that raw instant reaction and early analysis is lost. Yesterday’s broadcast of the BBC’s 1992 election coverage as live on BBC Parliament hammered this point home. Continue reading

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The beauty of raw news

Everyone remembers where they were and what they were doing when a big story broke. Whether it is waking up in a Bangkok hotel to find that Michael Jackson had died or hearing about the 7/7 bombings on your radio during your journey to work you are consuming the news in its rawest form: live, rolling news as it happens.

Whilst I love documentaries, packages and films, news in its purest sense does have a beauty. The impact of those first reports is lost with editing and hindsight. You will never recapture that moment again. Continue reading

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Freelance but not fancy free

Abdullah’s words, which she deeply regrets, might never have been seen by the families of the young men who died had it not been for the fact that some people who spotted them noticed that her Twitter profile said she had written for the Guardian. This led some Twitter users to leap to the conclusion that she was on the newspaper’s staff, which amplified their shock and surprise.

via Open door: Kia Abdullah, Twitter and the Guardian | Comment is free | The Guardian.

Last week the Guardian received complaints about tweets made by a writer who occasionally writes for the Comment is Free section of its website.

This week, readers’ editor Chris Elliott dealt with the incident, in which the freelancer Kia Abdullah, made an attempt at some black humour on Twitter following the deaths of three backpackers in Thailand. The joke backfired and Abdullah’s association with the Guardian led to complaints to the paper.  Even Alan Rusbridger, the editor in chief, ended up commenting when he described the remarks as “grossly insensitive”.

I won’t go into too much detail about the original tweets (which Abdullah has now removed on request and apologised for) and the aftermath which Elliott has described in his column. What I want to post about is freelancing and responsibility to our clients and how far this should go. Continue reading

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Future or Bust!

Uploaded by Vermin Inc.

Recently, I’ve been thinking a lot about the future. Although to be fair, I haven’t done much of the thinking myself – there are many people better placed than me to do that. For me, it’s been more of an exercise of observing and listening.

The two areas that have been the focus of this recent bout of crystal ball gazing are news and regeneration. In December and January I attended the Future of News group, a monthly discussion about where the news industry in this country is heading.

Continue reading

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Stop, collaborate and listen…

Alex Wood of the Berlin Project

Originally uploaded by berlinproject.

Last week I blogged about the launch of a journalism cooperative by the team behind The Berlin Project. There’s been a lot of talk about new business models for journalism, but the idea of cooperatives has barely been mentioned. So it’s refreshing to see someone breaking new ground in that respect.

Another model deserving more attention is social enterprise. At News:Rewired earlier this month, Philip John, one of the brains behind hyperlocal site The Lichfield Blog, outlined his plans to turn it into a social enterprise. In an excellent post on the JournalLocal site, John suggests that to save journalism, local media could go down the social enterprise route and fund its work through grants and subsidies.

Continue reading

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Twitter is here to stay

My post on Friday concerned a discussion on the BBC’s use of Twitter and Audioboo at the news:rewired event on Thursday where a delegate branded it a waste of the licence fee. Well, today events took a new turn with a Daily Express article criticising the time and money that Auntie was putting into social media.

Malcolm Cole, led the offensive against this article, pointing out that the journalists who were making claims about the lack of interest in BBC presenters’ Twitter feeds had confused followers and following. And after highlighting this example of sloppy journalism, he added for good measure that there were two journalists working on this story.

You can still click through to the embarrassing “story”, but you will find that it has been removed.

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And boo to you too

News:Rewired at City University January 2010

Drawnalism's take on news:rewired

It’s always a tough call to decide which break out session to go to at conferences and yesterday’s News:Rewired was no exception. The event, organised by the website Journalism.co.uk, offered a glimpse of how the media is changing and which news models could prosper in the future.

The morning session included break-outs on Multimedia, Social Media and Search Engine Optimisation. I opted for the first one. The speakers included Steve Phillips, a traffic and travel correspondent at BBC London, who outlined how social media applications have aided his in this work.

BBC London Travel uses Twitter for both information gathering and sharing. They invite people to tweet them from their phones with stories of travel chaos whilst they are out and about. They use that infomation on radio, television and online. And of course, they also have their own Twitter feed to update the Twitterati. Continue reading

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