Journalist technology column: Google Authorship and Infographics app

I have to thank a give-away of National Geographic Traveller at Stansted Airport for giving me the idea for my main piece in my latest technology column for The Journalist.

An article on “the end of the guide book” alerted me to Google Authorship – I was astonished that I hadn’t heard about what is potentially a really important development for journalists. Continue reading

Journalist technology column: 4G and 2013 trends

My latest technology column in the Journalist magazine focused on trends for 2013 – you can download a PDF version of it here.

Once again, I am including some of the links that I found useful when writing the column in this blog post. Continue reading

A rare byline in print

http://www.nuj.org.uk/innerPagenuj.html?docid=871Last month my first technology column was published in the Journalist magazine – you can download it here (December 2012 / January 2013).

I subsequently worked out that it was only my third byline in print this year, showing the extent I have shifted over to online platforms. Perhaps this is why it felt a bit odd not having to link to my research as I would normally do as an online journalist.

I am now looking ahead to the next column and have the nagging thought that the difficulty of linking in print is a real disadvantage with a tech column. As a result, I have decided to start linking to some of the websites I found useful while researching my column via this blog. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , ,

BBC Parliament’s ’92 Election Bonanza

In February I blogged about the beauty of news in its purest form and why it is worthwhile reviewing news from the past. My main point was that when news is processed into documentaries for example after the event, that raw instant reaction and early analysis is lost. Yesterday’s broadcast of the BBC’s 1992 election coverage as live on BBC Parliament hammered this point home. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The beauty of raw news

Everyone remembers where they were and what they were doing when a big story broke. Whether it is waking up in a Bangkok hotel to find that Michael Jackson had died or hearing about the 7/7 bombings on your radio during your journey to work you are consuming the news in its rawest form: live, rolling news as it happens.

Whilst I love documentaries, packages and films, news in its purest sense does have a beauty. The impact of those first reports is lost with editing and hindsight. You will never recapture that moment again. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , ,

Melting pot or goldfish bowl? BBC exposes engine room to the public gaze | The Independent

Melting pot or goldfish bowl? BBC exposes engine room to the public gaze – TV & Radio – Media – The Independent.

This is nothing new. It was revealed by the Broadcasting House project manager in Ariel – the BBC’s in-house magazine – about 18 months ago. But it is fantastic news that the BBC has stuck with this part of its plans to promote the openness of the newsroom.

For more on this and other initiatives to move the newsroom back into the community, please see my feature for the Journalist in the February / March 2011 issue. I also blogged about newsroom openness at the time.

Tagged , , , ,

Student journalists in the community: Learning and legacy

Hyperlocal blogs are a great way for student journalists to get some experience of reporting, community management and online publishing. But what do their potential readers think of student-run hyperlocal blogs? Members of a community in Sheffield recently gave student bloggers a very hard time when they attempted to engage with their potential readership.

The problem seems to stem from the fact that there are two universities in Sheffield, plus a very good further education college, and therefore a lot of students working on community-based projects. Not only do you have journalism students working on community-based projects, you have film makers, geography students, law students and nursing students. At any one time there must be hundreds of students making contact with community groups and local online forums.

Now, there are of course some fabulous examples of students who have done fantastic things for a community as part of their course or with a student society. There are law students who have helped to challenge wrongful convictions as part of the Innocence Network and there are many other fantastic examples of where student projects have been a force for good. Continue reading

Tagged , , , , , , , ,
%d bloggers like this: